Home Lifestyle Ohana Day celebrates beach lifestyle in Seal Beach – OCRegister

Ohana Day celebrates beach lifestyle in Seal Beach – OCRegister

10 min read
0
2

It’s a family-style gathering that celebrates all aspects of the beach.

Ohana Day brought beach-lovers to Seal Beach on Saturday, April 13, an early Earth Day event hosted by the Huntington Beach and Seal Beach Surfrider chapters.

  • Plastic straws that filled up a wheelbarrow were among the 441 pounds of trash collected during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Leiali’ianani dancers perform during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • Sound

    The gallery will resume inseconds

  • Sage Thomsen mimics the Leiali’ianani dancers who were performing during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • Lil Strader picks up garbage near the Seal Beach pier during Ohana Day on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • A group of coworkers for a rental car company do the “Killer Hertz” dance before heading out to pick up garbage during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • Rob Strader picks up nurdles on Seal Beach during Ohana Day on Saturday, April 13, 2019. A nurdle is a very small pellet of plastic which serves as raw material in the manufacture of large-scale plastic products. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Hui O Hula dancers from Leisure World perform during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Leiali’ianani dancers perform during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • TJ and Julissa Johnson stretch out before heading out to pick up garbage on Seal Beach during Ohana Day on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Leiali’ianani dancers perform during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Leiali’ianani dancers perform during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • Peggy Sue Mulvihill displays a windsurfing Barbie, one of the pieces of refuse picked up on Seal Beach during Ohana Day on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Leiali’ianani dancers perform during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

  • Veteran surfer Michael Pless, 69, talked about ocean pollution to a group before giving lessons. First-time surfer Jordan Rivas falls off his board during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)
    Photo by Bill Alkofer

  • The Leiali’ianani dancers perform during Ohana Day at the Seal Beach Pier on Saturday, April 13, 2019. The event was hosted by the Seal Beach/Huntington Beach Surfrider Chapter. (Photo by Bill Alkofer, Contributing Photographer)

Now in its 12th year, Ohana Day — Ohana, in Hawaiian, translates to “family” — has grown to more than two dozen vendors set up on the sand with environmentally focused messages, drawing upward of 2,000 people through the day.

There were free marine biology lessons from Science 2 U and a booth from the Shark Lab at California State University, Long Beach for people interested in learning about local sea creatures.

Polynesian dancers — including local students and a group from Leisure World — entertained the crowd. In the water, free surf classes and bodyboarding clinics were offered.

Organizers said 265 volunteers, who scoured the sand for debris, picked up 411 pounds of trash.

The filled an entire wheelbarrow full of plastic straws.

“Plastic straws have already been banned in Idaho,” said  KC Fockler, the education director for the Huntington/Seal Beach Surfriders. “They’re ahead of us on that curve.  Maybe we should get a chapter in Boise.  We already have one in Wisconsin.”

Fockler said that Seal Beach water is its worst after heavy rains.  “You’re basically swimming in brown crap water,” Fockler said.

Michael Pless, 69, has been surfing since he was 12.

“A sick wave can literally make you sick,” said Pless, who operates M&M Surfing in Seal Beach. “I carry antibiotics with me in my van. This has been the worst winter ever.  I’d say that there were 25 percent more days this year that you couldn’t go into the water.”

Rob Strader, a surfing coach from Millikan High School in Long Beach, knows the science behind the threat to the oceans.  He was there with his children and mixed a serious day with some fun on the beach.

He picked up and commented on a tiny grain of plastic known as a nurdle. That’s a pellet that serves a raw material for medical plastics.

Nurdles are a biological hazard for a fish and turtles, he said.

Contributing photographer Bill Alkofer contributed to this story.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)


Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

Inside the Private World of Queen Elizabeth II – E! NEWS

Dominic Lipinski – WPA Pool / Getty Images Monarch. Tenacious family matriarch. Love…